Thursday, November 7 – 5-8 PM

  • $50 for teachers and students
  • $75 for TED attendees

To register for the DLD@Night Workshop go to https://ted.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/24

DLD@Night – Strand Descriptions

Strand 1: Early Literacy Intervention: Tell It Like It Is

In this strand, teachers will learn about high-impact evidence-based practices to meet the needs of students with specific learning disabilities in reading, students with dyslexia, and students who are having difficulty learning to read.  Specifically, presentations in this strand will cover early literacy development, assessment practices, and evidence based practices for students who experience difficulty with reading.

  • DLD Board Member Hosts:
    • Emily Solari, Ph.D. University of Virginia
    • Kristen Beach, Ph.D. University of North Carolina Charlotte
  • Presenter Names:
    • Devin Kearns, Ph.D .University of Connecticut
    • Nancy Nelson, Ph.D. University of Oregon
    • Jill Pentimonit, Ph.D. American Institutes for Research

Strand 2:  Change is Gonna’ Come: Maximize Students’ Mathematical Learning by Intensifying Instruction

All students can excel to their fullest potential when provided the necessary instructional supports. This strand is designed to focus on evidence-based interventions for students with dyscalculia and other specific learning disabilities in mathematics. Specifically, the session will provide useful and practical instructional strategies and techniques to better equip teachers addressing the needs of students with exceptionalities in grades K-12 to close the achievement gap in mathematics

  • DLD Board Member Hosts:
    • Elizabeth Hughes, Ph.D. Penn State University
    • Paul Riccomini, Ph.D. Penn State University
  • Presenter Names:
    • Christian Doabler, Ph.D. University of Texas Austin
    • Asha Jitendra, Ph.D. University of California Riverside
    • Sarah Powell, Ph.D. University of Texas Austin

Strand 3: Ain’t No Sunshine: The Importance of Teaching and Assessing Writing Instruction When Including Students with Diverse Learning Needs

This strand will provide educators with evidence-based practices for teaching and assessing writing instruction. Presenters will connect ongoing intervention research with suggestions for practical implementation in your school that increases writing achievement for academically diverse learners.

  • DLD Board Member Host:
    • Michael Faggella-Luby, Ph.D. Texas Christian University
    • David Bateman, Ph.D. Shippensburg University
  • Presenter Names:
    • Shawn Datchuk, Ph.D. University of Iowa
    • Micheal Hebert, Ph.D. University of Nebraska Lincoln
    • Erica Lembke, Ph.D. University of Missouri

Strand 4: Stand By Me: Preparing Educators for the New Reality of Teaching Students with Dyslexia in K-12 Schools (School Administrators and Higher Education Faculty Only)

This strand focuses on recent changes in legislation as well as ongoing research on evidence-based practices for teaching students with dyslexia in K-12 schools. Presenters will outline ways for administrators and university faculty to best prepare preservice and inservice educators for working with students who have the specific learning disability dyslexia.

  • DLD Board Member Hosts:
    • Peggy Weiss, Ph.D. George Mason University
    • Bill Therrien, Ph.D. University of Virginia
  • Presenter Names:
    • Mary Brownell, Ph.D. University of Florida
    • Steve Ciullo, Ph.D. Texas State University
    • Kristin Sayeski, Ph.D. University of Georgia

DLD@Night Strands – Biographies

Strand 1 – Early Literacy

Devin Kearns
Devin Kearns

Devin is an associate professor of Special Education in the Department of Educational Psychology in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut and a Center for Behavioral Education & Research (CBER) and Haskins Laboratories research scientist. He holds a Ph.D. in Special Education from Vanderbilt University. Devin researches reading disability—including dyslexia—and designs, implements, and tests reading intervention programs to help these students. He examines their impact on reading achievement and neurobiological processing. He publishes articles for educators and researchers on reading difficulty. He often provides professional development to help educators implement high-quality reading instruction.

Nancy Nelson
Nancy Nelson

Nancy J. Nelson, Ph.D., is a Research Assistant Professor at the Center on Teaching and Learning at the University of Oregon, and the Director of Clinic and Outreach Services. Dr. Nelson is a Co-Principal Investigator on the National Comprehensive Center on Improving Literacy for Students with Disabilities and leads its Professional Development and Technical Assistance Priority Strand. She is also Co-Principal Investigator on the National Center on Improving Literacy through Supporting Elementary School Leaders and the Project Director of the implementation arm of a newly funded evaluation of Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) in Early Reading. She has been Principal or Co-Principal Investigator on more than ten IES, NSF, and OSEP awards to develop and evaluate math and reading interventions implemented in MTSS. Collectively, Dr. Nelson has managed more than 35 million dollars in external funds. Dr. Nelson has authored more than 65 conference presentations and 30 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Nelson is a licensed school psychologist in Oregon, a nationally certified school psychologist, and a licensed special education teacher in Oregon and California. She is a former middle and high school special education math teacher with expertise in reading, math, and technology-based interventions for students at risk for disabilities and the use of assessment to inform intervention in MTSS. Dr. Nelson has extensive experience working with direct observation systems and measuring implementation of evidence-based practices in classrooms, and experience training pre- and in-service teachers to work in diverse, urban schools.

Jill Pentimonti
Jill Pentimonti

Jill M. Pentimonti. Ph.D., is a Principal Researcher at the American Institutes for Research (AIR). Dr. Pentimonti serves as Principal Investigator on two grants from the Institutes for Education Sciences (IES); a psychometric evaluation of an early childhood classroom observation tool and efficacy evaluation study of an early literacy program in New York City’s PreK for All classrooms. She also leads an internally-funded grant to evaluate the implementation of a language-based intervention in infant-toddler programs throughout the state of Pennsylvania. Additionally, Dr. Pentimonti serves as lead of Knowledge Development for the National Center on Intensive Intervention (NCII). Her work on NCII includes managing activities related to developing and synthesizing knowledge on academic and behavioral interventions and assessments.

Strand 2 – Math Instruction

Sarah Powell
Sarah Powell

Sarah R. Powell is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Powell currently conducts research with funding from the Institute of Education Sciences, Office of Special Education Programs, National Science Foundation, T.L.L. Temple Foundation, and the Texas Education Agency. Her research interests include developing and testing interventions for students with mathematics difficulties, with a special emphasis on peer tutoring, word-problem solving, mathematics writing, and the symbols and vocabulary within mathematics.

Christian Doabler
Christian Doabler

Christian T. Doabler is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Doabler’s research focuses on designing and testing intensive, early mathematics and science interventions for students who are with or at risk for learning disabilities in mathematics, reading, and science. His research also includes investigating teachers’ use and uptake of evidence-based teaching practices. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed publications, and led the design and development of four IES-sponsored Tier 2 mathematics interventions and two NSF-sponsored Tier 2 mathematics interventions.

Asha Jitendra
Asha Jitendra

Asha K. Jitendra, is Professor and Peloy Chair in Learning Disabilities in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside. She previously served as Rodney Wallace Professor for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at the University of Minnesota for 10 years and on the faculty of Lehigh University for 14 years. She has published two research-based mathematics curricula and the IES Practice Guide, Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 through 8. Jitendra has been the associate editor of the Journal of Learning Disabilities. Her research focuses on instructional design, specifically mathematics problem solving and reading interventions for students with learning disabilities; assessment; and textbook analysis. Jitendra is best known for her research on schema-based instruction (SBI) for solving word problems. Specifically, her work on SBI has evolved over the last 25 years to incorporate curriculum design theory and combine best practices in special education and contemporary mathematics education to improve mathematics outcomes for a wide range of learners (e.g., students with learning disabilities, students at risk and not at risk for learning difficulties). 

Strand 3 – Written Expression

Erica Lembke
Erica Lembke

Erica Lembke, Ph.D. is a professor and chair of the Department of Special Education at the University of Missouri.  Her research interests include developing strategies to improve special education students’ academic performance and progress monitoring in basic academic skills for elementary, middle, and secondary students. She has served as a PI or Co-PI on federal grants totally close to $9.3 million. She serves on many editorial and advisory boards, is the immediate past Editor for Assessment for Effective Intervention, and is Past President of CEC-Division for Learning Disabilities. She provides numerous workshops and technical assistance related to intervention and data-based decision-making. In addition, she is one of the primary leads on the development of the Evidence Based Intervention network (ebi.missouri.edu) math briefs. Prior to joining the faculty at Mizzou, she was an elementary special education teacher for 6 years in Iowa, including teaching Title I reading.

Michael Hebert
Michael Hebert

Michael Hebert is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, and also serves as the director of the Kit and Dick Schmoker Reading Center.  Michael’s research interests include reading and writing development, how writing instruction influences reading development, and the identification of effective “writing to read” practices. He teaches classes in reading and writing disabilities, and instructional methods for students with diverse needs.  Michael received his doctorate in special education from Vanderbilt University after spending eight years as a classroom teacher and reading specialist in public schools in Arizona, Massachusetts and California.

Shawn Datchuk
Shawn Datchuk

Dr. Shawn Datchuk is an Assistant Professor of Special Education at the University of Iowa.  He studies writing interventions and assessment for students with disabilities.  Previously, he was a special education teacher and academic director in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Strand 4 – Teacher Prep (higher education faculty only)

Kristin Sayeski
Kristin Sayeski

Dr. Sayeski is an associate professor and co-director of the Graduate Certificate in Dyslexia in the Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education at the University of Georgia. She received her doctorate in special education from the University of Virginia in 2000. Dr. Sayeski serves as the editor of TEACHING Exceptional Children, the Council for Exceptional Children’s research-to-practice journal and as an associate editor for Intervention in School and Clinic. Dr. Sayeski’s work has been published in research and practitioner journals including Annals of DyslexiaExceptionalityTeacher Education and Special Education, and Intervention in School and Clinic. Dr. Sayeski currently serves as the past-president of the Division for Learning Disabilities. Her professional and research interests include identifying exemplary practices in teacher training and determining effective instructional practices for students with reading disabilities.

Mary Brownell
Mary Brownell

Dr. Mary Brownell is a Professor of Special Education at the University of Florida. She has spent much of her research specializing in issues relating to teachers who work with students with disabilities. Recently, she has studied how school districts can prepare, develop, and retain high quality special education teachers. Her recent research efforts focus on improving the reading instruction of both general and special education teachers and improving the induction of beginning special education teachers into the classroom. In collaboration with her colleagues from UF, she has received over $11,000,000 in funding from OSEP and IES.

Stephen Ciullo
Stephen Ciullo

Stephen Ciullo is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Texas State University, and is serving as Secretary for the Division of Learning Disabilities (DLD). Stephen teaches courses on learning disabilities, inclusion, and literacy instruction. Stephen is the Primary Investigator (PI) of a research grant funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) that explores the knowledge and skills of educators who provide writing instruction to students with disabilities. Ciullo is also a Co-PI on an IES-funded grant that will examine content-area writing instruction in inclusive middle-school classrooms. The purpose of his research is to understand if teachers are utilizing evidence-based practices. This information can guide teacher preparation, professional development, and intervention research.

Register at https://ted.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/home/24

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